How do you stack large, active, open spaces so they are safe, yet don’t make a sound?
How do you stack large, active, open spaces so they are safe, yet don’t make a sound?

UCSF Mission Bay William J. Rutter Center

This large Community Center combines the open layout of the architectural vision with acoustic sensitivity and seismic strength.

Customized Solution
  • This 150,000 s.f., 5-story structure sitting on a deep foundation system houses a suspended swimming pool, gymnasium, assembly hall, fitness center, convention center, locker rooms, food court, and offices.
  • With large, open spaces throughout the center, attention to seismic performance was a necessity. This issue was addressed by using high performance buckling restrained braced frames (BRBF) as the seismic stabilizing system.
  • The building layout required stacking the gymnasium and pool over an acoustically sensitive auditorium. This was achieved by isolating the concrete floor of the gymnasium while specially constructing the ceiling of the auditorium to dampen sound. With this design, students can play basketball upstairs without keeping the academic conference room below abreast of the score.
 
CATEGORIES

Academic - University, Athletic Facilities


HIGHLIGHTS
  • Architect: Ricardo Legorreta (design) and MBT (Perkins + Will) (executive)
  • Owner: University of California, San Francisco
  • Steel framed with buckling restrained braced frames
  • Serves as the “heart” of the new UCSF Mission Bay campus