When a hospital sits in a valley, where do you place a new addition so it fits in perfectly with its neighbors?
When a hospital sits in a valley, where do you place a new addition so it fits in perfectly with its neighbors?

Laguna Honda Hospital & Rehabilitation Center

The project scope included a new, 140,000 s.f., 4-story pavilion building, and the seismic strengthening and remodeling of additional existing wings totaling 80,000 s.f.  The pavilion creates a physical and functional link between the hospital’s new residential towers and the original 1920s hospital buildings. This LEED Silver project is the first LEED Certified hospital in California and the first LEED certified nursing facility in the nation.

Customized Solution
  • Forell/Elsesser provided complete engineering services for the design and detailing of the tall retaining structures at either end of the pavilion which enabled the continued function of the undermined existing adjacent structures throughout construction.  A monitored tangent pile tieback system was used to allow for a 30 foot vertical excavation immediately adjacent to an existing residence hall.
  • The flexible steel EBF brace lateral system was designed to work with the concrete shear walls present at either end of the structure where the pavilion is buried in the rising sides of the valley.
  • The rehabilitation of the existing wings was detailed to minimize the impact to the existing structure and maximized the use of the historic reinforced concrete structural elements.  During construction the opportunity was taken to repair and restore in-place existing deteriorated concrete framing.
CATEGORIES

Healthcare, Historic Renovation


HIGHLIGHTS
  • Architect: Anshen + Allen Architects / Stantec
  • Owner: City and County of San Francisco
  • The new pavilion is steel framed with eccentric braced frames. The rehabilitation of the existing wings included new concrete shear walls
  • Structural analysis explicitly modeled foundation stiffnesses, and by doing so enabled the use of economical spread footings under more than half the structure in lieu of drilled piers